Port Networks WiFi bridge, another approach

Ben Ellison

Ben Ellison

Panbo editor, publisher & chief bottlewasher from 4/2005 until 8/2018, and now pleased to have Ben Stein as a very able publisher, webmaster, and editing colleague. Please don't regard him as an "expert"; he's getting quite old and thinks that "fadiddling fumble-putz" is a more accurate description.

4 Responses

  1. I used a patch antenna that has about a 90 degree range of coverage and 9dB gain. It seems to work for the 450′ I’ve needed to cover at my friend’s marina. It is connected to a Linksys WiFi bridge, which is wired into the ethernet network on his boat.
    The patch antenna seems to be a fairly good compromise as it can handle a bit of heeling or swinging on the mooring.

  2. Ron Rogers says:

    While interesting, I would need to see range and signal quality comparisons before plunking dow $349. I had been using a Buffalo USB Airstation which I hung off a clothesline acoss the stern. After being knocked down by my carelessness over 50 times, it finally had an LED break off the PCB and died. Not bad for $42 and it got an excellent signal at a range of 60 yards from a weird omni antenna installed back near the marina building.
    Since a replacement was not available locally
    (New B 2.0 Adapter for $79. It’s superb and located inside the cabin. 1/2 the size of a cigarette pack.

  3. Ron Rogers says:

    The part that was chopped off my previous message referred to the Netgear RangeMax Wireless USB 2.0 Adapter Model WPN111.

  4. Interesting… for those smaller boats and/or those that don’t want/need something permanently installed.
    Understand they also have what they call custom bridge systems (bridge/router capable) that would be more permanently installed.
    From my experience. Need more than 50 foot of cable though on most bigger yachts.

    Alan Spicer
    http://www.marinetelecom.net

Join the conversation

Your email address will not be published.