NMEA 2000 cabling, Airmar’s in

Ben Ellison

Ben Ellison

Panbo editor, publisher & chief bottlewasher from 4/2005 until 8/2018, and now pleased to have Ben Stein as a very able publisher, webmaster, and editing colleague.

5 Responses

  1. Lee Guite says:

    Hi Ben. You obviously should go the route with the 2000 wire and connections for your new boat now that finally more products are compatible. Rewiring for me over the last 8 years (grr) has been 0183 which is now done except for occasional replacements like updating the grounding wiring done a year ago to get to code. The price of copper now has brought anything new to a halt for my 24 year old sail boat. Lee

  2. Ben Ellison Ben Ellison says:

    You bet, Lee! There may be two backbones, one for real stuff including shift, throttle, and autopilot control, and another for experimenting.

  3. Ben Ellison Ben Ellison says:

    It’s been brought to my attention that Airmar’s NMEA 2000 cabling is apparently not NMEA certified. I’ll take responsibilty for the mistaken quote up there, which came from my (flawed) memory.
    As to what cable certification means in the real world, I’m not sure. I don’t think SimNet, SeaTalkng, LowranceNet, or Garmin cabling is certified either, and Airmar’s “looks” most like the real thing, and has purportedly passed Airmar’s own testing, which I suspect was vigorous.
    However, the cabling sold by Molex and Maretron may have the very best shielding and be superior in other respects, it’s price competitive with most everything else, and it is CERTIFIED.

  4. walter schumacher says:

    I lost my temperature reading on my 4y old Airmar paddle wheel transducer hooked up to Furuno Navnet 1. Any suggestions? Thank you Walt

  5. Kees says:

    @Walter:
    This is the most common failure mode for the combined speed/temp transducers. It happens to most of us. Learn to live with it, or buy a new one.

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