Category: When things go wrong…

15

Ben Stein & family lose their boat to Hurricane Ian

Ben Stein and his family evacuated from Fort Myers on Tuesday night, that’s the great news. But at about 7 pm last night their beloved boat and home on the water Have Another Day sank in her slip at a well-engineered marina 14 miles up the Caloosahatchee River as Ben watched the aft bilge pump try to keep up via remote monitoring. Here in Maine I’m near tears at their loss…

3

Digital Yacht launch GPS160F for legacy Furuno products

Digital Yacht have introduced a new version of the GPS160 which is a simple replacement for older Furuno plotter and GPS systems.  Devices like the Furuno GP32, Navnet and GPS310/320 utilise a specific format for GPS data and this new sensor emulates that for essential compatibility.  Some of these older GPS sensors have suffered from technical issues with the GPS system roll over changes which can render a chart plotter becoming useless without a working GPS input.  The GPS160F provides an economical and reliable solution to these problems…

3

ACR: Search and Rescue Operation off Key Largo Saves Five Lives

Sea angler Jacob Tanner, from Broward County, Florida, has told how activating an ACR Electronics EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon) saved his and four other lives when a day out fishing went terrifyingly wrong. Jacob had taken his uncle and three of his uncle’s friends out in the family’s 25ft leisure fishing boat off Key Largo and had started kite fishing while drifting in around 150ft of open water. Waves were about 5 or 6ft, but slow rollers quite a distance apart…

8

FLIR C5 thermal inspection camera, finding issues before they’re big trouble

If you’re like me, at some point in your boating career you’ve probably found an electrical problem on your boat only after things got a little scary. Perhaps the problem was one of your making or maybe, like my example linked above, the boat came that way. Now that I’m doing more work on the DC systems aboard my own boats and others, I went looking for a way to ensure the quality of my work and the health of the systems aboard. For the last few jobs, I’ve been verifying my work with a FLIR C5 thermal inspection camera. I think it delivers real peace of mind.

AP News Oct 18, 2021 4

Drug smuggling, the sailing feats we rarely hear about?

When I got serious about sailing and seamanship fifty years ago, I read all sorts of offshore cruising and racing accounts, particularly interested in the problems that came up and the solutions found. It seemed valuable to learn that, say, a well-found 46-foot ketch could pitchpole stern-over-bow in certain situations and how the crew survived. But eventually I realized that there was a whole niche of especially extreme ocean voyaging that was almost never discussed, except maybe quietly in remote harbors or jail cells…

80

Vendée Globe 2020, all hail Jean Le Cam!

Great to see an AIS MOB device helping with the amazing rescue of Vendée Globe solo racer Kevin Escoffier early this morning (Universal Time). At 14:00 UTC yesterday afternoon, he’d had to transition from surfing his foiling IMOCA 60 PRB at 25+ knots in 10-13 foot seas about 840 miles southwest of Cape Town — 3rd in what was then a 32-boat fleet — to grabbing a survival suit and jumping into his liferaft, all in about two minutes. Yike!…

7

Lightning strikes, nicely refit 1978 Bristol 29.9 dies

We know how dangerous lightning can be to a boat and its crew, but to see it actually strike is something else. After a multi-year DIY refit, the 1978 Bristol 29.9 Perseverance lays at a Dorchester float completely ready for a challenging offshore race, but one second later she’s damaged beyond repair. Fortunately, the owner was not on board, and now he and the CCA have made the lightning damage details available to all of us who should be aware of how perverse and pervasive they can be…

29

Snagging lobster pots & a DIY hookah solution, cordless compressor update

With winter setting in fast, it’s nice to remember summer, even a cruising hassle like snarling lobster trap gear around Gizmo’s running gear. During my 48 years in Maine waters, the catch has increased from 20 to 120 million pounds and the pot buoy systems have gotten significantly tougher; so snagging one has become much more of a hazard. But the grin above is not just because I’d finally cut away this particular mess; I think I’ve found a reliable snarl solution that will even work out in the remote Maine islands that lobsters, lobstermen, and cruisers all appreciate…